Thursday, July 30, 2015

Lesson Plan: Problem Solving: Multi-Step Problems


This lesson utilizes enVision Math, but ideas can be adapted for other texts.  Many of the hyperlinks will direct you to a place to download the resources used throughout this lesson. (Note: You must have ActivInspire downloaded to view the Promethean Board slides)

Subject: Math
Grade: 5th

Source: enVision Math 2.8

Integration of Learning Outcomes

  • Students will be able to use multi-steps to solve a variety of problems by making sense of problems and persevering in solving them, reasoning abstractly and quantitatively, attending to precision, looking for and making use of structure, and looking for and expressing regularity in repeated reasoning.
  • Students will be able to add and subtract decimals by solving word problems.
 Standards
  • 5.NBT.7: Add and subtract decimals to hundredths; relate the strategy to a written method and explain the reasoning used.
Anticipatory Set

· “Multi-step problems can be challenging. It is important to figure out what you know and what you need to know and to plan the steps necessary to solve the problem. Suppose you are given this problem:”
o   Julia wants to buy three pens at $1.99 each and two notebooks at $2.50 each. What is the total cost?
o   Students will list what they know, what they need to know, and the steps to solving the problem before solving the problem.
o   Drag the parts of the question into the appropriate column on the Promethean Board.
o   Students will write out the steps to solving the problem
§  Find the cost of three pens at $1.99 each. ($5.97)
§  Find the cost of two notebooks at $2.50 each. ($5.00)
§  Find the total cost. ($10.97)
o   Students will solve problem on their whiteboards.

Lesson Plan: Math "Figure Me Out"

This lesson was adapted from "Fourth Grade Fun in Florida" and "Beyond Traditional Math."

Looking for a Back-to-School (or End-of-the-Year) math activity? "Figure Me Out" is a great idea to get students thinking about math and numbers.  This activity gets students to use all operations.

First, have students do a rough draft. Students pick some facts about themselves that involve numbers. They write these down, then develop a number sentence that gets them to that number. When students are on their good copy, they write the fact with the answer underneath. Then, they put a post-it with their equation overtop their answer.  Make sure that their names are on the back and not the front!
Source: Fourth Grade Fun in Florida

Once they are decorated and colorful, hang them around the room (or in the hallway). Students go around solving the problems, and guessing whose is whose.

This can be differentiated for higher-level math students as well. Students might have to develop equations that follow PEMDAS.  Answers could also include solving for variables.

Here is a simple rubric that I developed with requirements for the mini poster. This was used for 5th grade at the end of the year:


Thursday, July 23, 2015

Lesson Plan: Solving Equations with Fractions

The embedded Algebra lesson is on solving equations with fractions. Included in the lesson is a notes sheet.

Click the following link to view the lesson on solving equations with fractions.  Download the task cards on The Teacher Sharing Network's Teachers Pay Teachers Page.  The Two-Step Equations Maze can also be found on Teachers Pay Teachers.

 

Lesson Plan: Mental Math with Decimals

This lesson utilizes enVision Math, but ideas can be adapted for other texts.  Many of the hyperlinks will direct you to a place to download the resources used throughout this lesson. (Note: You must have ActivInspire downloaded to view the Promethean Board slides)

Source: enVision Math 2.1
Subject: Math
Grade: 5th

Integration of Learning Outcomes

· Students will be able to compute sums and differences mentally using the Commutative and Associative Properties of Addition, compatible numbers, and compensation by making sense of problems and persevere in solving them, reasoning abstractly and quantitatively, attending to precision, and looking for and making use of structure.

Standards

· 5.NBT.7: Add and subtract decimals to hundredths using strategies based on properties of operations, and/or the relationship between addition and subtraction.

Anticipatory Set

· Ask: “What kinds of numbers do you find easier to add and subtract mentally?” Students will do a think-pair-share with a partner. Have 2-3 students share their responses. Mention that we will be doing metal math, and that we will break down the problems in order to solve them mentally and quickly.

· Students will work on a modified version of the Problem-Based Interactive Learning (PBIL).
o   PBIL: Suppose you want to buy new video games.  Just Dance costs $20.75. Minecraft costs $10.59, and Super Mario costs $18.25. Use mental math to find the total cost of all three games ($49.59).  Use mental math to find how much more Just Dance is than Minecraft. ($10.16)
§  Students will solve the problem by discussing with their group.  They must use mental math and talk through the process of how they solved it.  Have a few groups share their responses to the class.  Ask if students changed the subtraction problem at all to make it easier.  Model and demonstrate different ways to solve problems when necessary.


Lesson Plan: Rounding Whole Numbers & Decimals


This lesson utilizes enVision Math, but ideas can be adapted for other texts.  Many of the hyperlinks will direct you to a place to download the resources used throughout this lesson. (Note: You must have ActivInspire downloaded to view the Promethean Board slides)

Source: 2.2 enVision Math
Subject: Math
Grade: 5th

Integration of Learning Outcomes
  • Students will be able to round whole numbers through millions and decimals through thousandths by attending to precision and looking for and expressing regularity in repeated reasoning.
Standards
  • 5.NBT.4: Use place value understanding to round decimals to any place.
  • M05.A-T.1.1.5: Round decimals to any place (limit rounding to ones, tenths, hundredths, or thousandths place).
  • CC.2.1.5.B.1: Apply place value to show an understanding of operations and rounding as they pertain to whole numbers and decimals.
Anticipatory Set

Complete a modified version of the Problem-Based Interactive Learning. The problem will be posted on the Promethean Board. Students will work independently and write their answers on their white board.
o   Numbers: 1,280; 1,213; 1,215; 1,208
o   Problem: For each number tell if the number is closer to 1,200 or 1,300.  Tell how you decided.
o   Reveal the number line after a few moments.  Have students draw a number line on their whiteboards.  Have them record where the numbers should be.
§  Have students come up to the board to plot the points while the others work at their seats.
§  Ask: “Which numbers are closer to 1,200?” (1,208, 1,213)  “Which numbers are closer to 1,300?” (1,280).  Show that 1,250 is right in the middle.
§  Show that this can be determined through subtraction (1,213 – 1,200 = 13; 1,300-1,213 = 87; Therefore, 1,213 is closer to 1,200.)
§  Have students round the numbers to nearest hundred on their whiteboards.


Wednesday, July 22, 2015

Display: Figurative Language

Check out this interactive figurative language board! Students can find examples from books, write the quote on post-it notes, and stick them to the board!




You can purchase these posters on The Teacher Sharing Network's Teachers Pay Teachers Page! Click here to download!

Display: Turn & Talk

Turn and Talk is a great strategy to use in the classroom. Students are given a chance to discuss their ideas with a partner.

Here are some of the benefits of Turn and Talks or Think-Pair-Shares:

  • Every student gets to share his or her ideas.
  • Students can build ideas and knowledge off of each other.
  • Students can learn from their peers.
  • It helps to build a classroom community.
  • Providing a chance of dialogue in the classroom can decrease out-of-turn talking, or other disruptive behaviors.
  • It is an easy check-in. Listening in can serve as a formative assessment to see if the students are understanding.
  • Builds communication and speaking skills.

Check out this anchor chart with Turn and Talk guidelines and expectations.